Pressing Promposals

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Pressing Promposals

Sarah Stierch [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]

Sarah Stierch [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]

Sarah Stierch [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)]

The idea of prom has been romanticized in movies and television shows throughout the decades. The typical American cliché idealizes a night of dressing up and going out with friends, but now due to the popularity of “promposals,” the expectations of prom have become extreme.

A Dallas student from 2001 is credited for the first promposal after he asked his date to prom over the school’s loudspeaker.

“Our generation loves doing it bigger and better,” a student representative from Dallas is quoted as saying, “and prom is one event where you can get to really show off–your date, your clothes.”

Despite this initial gesture, it wasn’t until 2005 that these grand displays gained popularity. Perhaps one of the most intense stages of the phase was in October of 2005, when the show “Laguna Beach” aired a promposal episode in which teens asked their friends to prom in unique ways. After the episode aired, promposals began to face backlash after several writers bashed the new take on an annual spring ritual.

Now in 2019, some may say that for high school students the promposal is at its peak being that students are more creative than ever before.

Senior Garrett Franco comments, “I think they are cool, kind of corny sometimes, but still a fun thing.”

Although many support the idea of being asked in a big way, there is still some criticism as to the effects of the gestures. Many have debated whether or not these proposals pressure students into making a decision they don’t want to make in order to spare someone’s feelings.

Senior Michael Plants says, “There is a lot of pressure to ask someone to prom because of all of the thought that is put into it, and the possibility of that person saying no is absolutely terrifying. You hope that you won’t get humiliated with the other person saying no.”

There are also concerns as to how far students will go to make a statement, especially after many videos of promposal fails and successes have gone viral.

Junior Aubrey Adams states, “I think that a flash mob is too much. I, personally, like just a simple but thoughtful promposal.”

In the end, whether a person decides to go big or small when it comes to promposals, it is truly the thought that counts. Just remember, with a night of dinner, dancing and dressing up, the prom-ise of a memorable night is almost always guaranteed.