Kody Oravetz brings history back to life

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Kody Oravetz brings history back to life

Kody Oravetz writes his way through Trinity one last time.

Kody Oravetz writes his way through Trinity one last time.

Kody Oravetz writes his way through Trinity one last time.

Kody Oravetz writes his way through Trinity one last time.

On May 1 at the Rodef Shalom Congregation in Pittsburgh, PA, Senior Kody Oravetz won second place and a scholarship in The 2019 Waldman International creative writing essay contest.

The contest was available to students in grades 6-12  to compete for academic scholarships. The students were asked to write a five paragraph essay on the subject of women during the Holocaust.

While on a field trip to the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh, Mrs. Berty met director Emily Bernstein who told Berty about the contest, and Berty chose to turn it into an assignment to give to her students in her Honors Creative Writing class.

Oravetz’s essay’s main character is a very intelligent, young woman named Koraline in Europe during the Holocaust. The story is about her experience and thought process throughout a series of very vivid and traumatic situations.

“It is very enlightening and interesting to completely submerge myself into a different person’s life, especially when that life is painfully tragic. This has showed me how to sympathize with very serious situations, and I would recommend this practice to help students open up to the world and the things that are happening,” said Oravetz

Oravetz has decided to go into writing because he sympathizes with those people and wants to try his best to put himself in their shoes.

“I wouldn’t call myself a “writer,” but again I got so into this piece because of the emotional and social severity of the topic,’’ commented Oravetz

For most people, writing a story comes with challenges that they have to overcome. For Oravetz , it was trying to get into tune with his character to give as much emotion as possible.

Oravetz said, “The most challenging part was getting into the mindset of a person who has been stripped of everything that makes them a human, and then expressing feeling that I have synthetically produced.”

Oravetz plans on using the $250 scholarship money he earned to continue writing in his spare time.

After graduating high school, Oravetz is going to pursue a career in education at California University of Pennsylvania.